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A classic treasure chest filled to the brim with gold coins

A Steal of a Deal

Their gold jewelry and electronics are priceless...literally

A sly group of con artists have set up shop in Alberta, offering people the deal of a lifetime—gold jewelry and electronics at unbeatable prices. But there’s one small catch. These shiny goods are about as real as Sasquatch.

The RCMP has warned the public that scammers are trolling around Oyen, Brooks, CrossIron Mills, and Swift Current, Saskatchewan.

The con artists have been approaching people at gas stations, parking lots, and other public areas this winter. According to the RCMP, the suspects have been seen driving around in newer-model rental vehicles.

As if selling fake goods wasn’t enough, the group has been selling sob stories too. The suspects claim to have broken or lost their bank cards and are selling valuables to fund their travels.

To make matters worse, the suspects have been using children to pull at the heartstrings of unsuspecting victims.

As it stands, descriptions of the suspects and vehicles have not yet been released.

But this isn’t the first time a con like this has been pulled off. In October 2022, the RCMP issued an almost identical warning.

Last year’s scammers would approach potential victims dressed to the nines in gold-coloured necklaces, rings, and earrings. Of course, all of this jewelry was fake.

“They put on a pretty compelling show…sometimes it’s a man, woman and child, and in other cases, it’s a group of men…in some cases, the group is driving a rental vehicle,” said Cst. Mansoor Sahak of the RCMP.

The suspects would then claim they were wealthy foreigners unable to access their money due to an error with the Canadian banking system.

In exchange for cash, the suspects would offer victims some of their family’s ‘highly valuable’ jewelry for a massive discount. But when the victims went to cash in their newfound wealth at a jeweller, they discovered the gold was fake.

“Anyone who is approached by such a group should walk away and immediately call 911. If you have already been approached by these people, please call your local police and make a report,” stated Sahak.

Is this the same con artists back for seconds?

Until the RCMP releases descriptions of the suspects, there’s no way to know for sure.

But next time someone offers you their family jewels, you may want to reconsider.

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